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Jason

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[Dec. 16th, 2016|08:11 pm]
Jason
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After getting home from work immediately appeared to be a traintastrophe in the making, went to see Esther Schor talk about her book "Bridge of Words". Kinda neat. The stalled train situation had resolved itself in the meantime, got home, had some ramen with K.
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[User Picture]From: nightspore
2016-12-17 08:30 pm (UTC)
Oh cool. Second time you've gone to see a colleague of mine. (First was Harry Mairson). This is her book on Esperanto right? She told me all about it a couple of years ago when I was at Princeton I've known her since college - her name to her friends was and is Starry Schor, and we met in a Blake class, where the teacher then quoted Blake's great lines: "The watery shore, / The starry floor, / Are given thee / Till break of day." (Harry, Starry and I were all in the same college class, though I didn't know him then.)
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[User Picture]From: nightspore
2016-12-17 08:30 pm (UTC)
Oh, right, just saw the tag. Esperanto. One thing I told her, probably too late for the book, was about my grad school German teacher. Her husband's parents were idealistic linguists who spoke only Esperanto in their house, so Esperanto was his first and only language. When he was 6 the nazis took his parents away - eventually they were murdered. And he was orphaned as the only native, non-bilingual Esperanto speaker in the world. Which was not the worst thing that happened to him, but didn't help.

Edited at 2016-12-17 08:33 pm (UTC)
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[User Picture]From: jcreed
2016-12-17 08:44 pm (UTC)
Interesting! Yeah, it is the Esperanto/travel memoir thing.

I was >this< close to, during the question period, asking if she had heard of that bit of verse that began "aliaj lipoj flustros vin" that I mentioned researching some months ago, since she made a definite point of being interested in e-o poetry in particular during the talk, but at the last minute I felt awkward that the poem wasn't Serious Poetry enough and I didn't want to embarrass myself. Still, I'll keep wondering who wrote it, until such a time as I actually find out --- it's just too tantalizing to not know, when the very subject of the poem is being forgotten/remembered.
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[User Picture]From: jcreed
2016-12-17 08:44 pm (UTC)
I suppose there's always still email, if I ever get over myself.
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[User Picture]From: nightspore
2016-12-19 02:15 pm (UTC)
Email! I did.

Starry loved the whole thing. And here's the answer!

It's a trans of "You'll Remember me" from "the Bohemian Girl" by Balfe-- librettist is Arthur Bunn. It's on youtube somewhere (in Eng).

My friend says he'd like your friend's eml so he can send a bill for the research.
(It's a joke, son!)
Very best,
Starry


Bonan matenon! Mi vekiĝis fruege (je la 4-a) kaj vidis vian mesaĝon.

Montriĝas ke mi ja povas solvi la misteron por la amiko. Alkroĉita estas la paĝo el “Kantaro Esperanta” de Butler, 1926. La aŭtoro estis Alfred Bunn; Butler estis la tradukisto. La nomo M.W. Balfe estas tiu de brita oper-verkisto. Bunn estis kaj reĝisoro kaj libretisto.

Iom da informo pri la paro Balfe/Bunn troviĝas ĉe http://www.james-joyce-music.com/song03_composer.html.

Diru al la kolego, ke la freneza amiko donu al mi sian adreson, por ke mi sendu la fakturon por la esplor-laboro . . .
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[User Picture]From: nightspore
2016-12-19 02:16 pm (UTC)
I like "esplor-laboro" for research.
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[User Picture]From: jcreed
2016-12-19 11:32 pm (UTC)
It's one my favorite vortkunmetaĵoj as well, yes. (vortkunmetaĵoj being, of course, a self-describing term for "compound words": word-with-put-thing-noun-plural)
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[User Picture]From: jcreed
2016-12-19 11:29 pm (UTC)
Amazing! Thanks for supplying the courage I lacked. Never would have guessed it was english in origin.
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[User Picture]From: jcreed
2016-12-17 08:47 pm (UTC)
on a slightly less dark note (not that I don't appreciate you sharing that anecdote) my one encounter with a denaskulo --- native speaker --- was Renato Corsetti's son when I stayed with his family in Rome one year in the early 2000s. He seemed like a totally normal kid, in contrast to the self-selected eccentricity that you tend to find among the adult by-choice speakers. (Which of course is not a criticism, I wouldn't have it any other way ;)
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