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Super busy and productive day. Morning and early afternoon: saw all… - Notes from a Medium-Sized Island [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Jason

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[Jun. 25th, 2016|09:51 pm]
Jason
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Super busy and productive day.

Morning and early afternoon: saw all the apartments. The first one seemed quite good, we put in an application on it. Good neighborhood, reasonably priced, 3rd (ergo topmost!) floor not too bad of a walkup, dishwasher, plenty of space, adequate division of space, good commute. Only downsides were no laundry (but laundromat not terribly far away), subway not super close (but not too far), and, well, astoria is far from friends and familiar haunts in brooklyn.

Evening: saw a movie named "The Lobster" with akiva and some of his esty-an pals, had a nice dinner with them at Black Forest after. The Lobster was amaaaaazing. I really liked it, even though I was fairly uncomfortable with several scenes. It was just... impeccably constructed. The acting was awkward af, by design, and executed perfectly. It communicated several things obliquely about the constructed world which were fun puzzles to figure out. I could maybe have done without the blood a couple of times, but it certainly wasn't gratuitous. It has Olivia Colman who you may remember remember in her breakout role as Julie in Numberwang. (9/10)
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: toorsdenote
2016-06-26 04:12 pm (UTC)
Weird question: did the movie include any explosions, strobe effects, fast camera movement, or other strong dark/light contrast?
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[User Picture]From: jcreed
2016-06-26 04:31 pm (UTC)
Not that I recall, unless possibly some of the scenes involving driving through the woods might have had flickering light incidentally. But I don't think it was a very strong effect even then.

It does have some upsetting violence perpetrated on innocent animals, and a suicide. It has one scene of extremely, theatrically absurd pantomime of what would reasonably be called sexual assault, but clothes remain on throughout, and it's "in quotes" as much as, say, Hamlet's The Murder of Gonzago was. That's all I can remember that might be worth warning about.
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[User Picture]From: toorsdenote
2016-06-26 06:26 pm (UTC)
Cool, thanks! I've been avoiding movie theaters because they tend to trigger migraines, but I've been contemplating going to see something less action-y than my usual theater movie to see if it has the same effect.
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[User Picture]From: queen_elvis
2016-06-27 04:53 pm (UTC)
You could perhaps throw money at the laundry problem by sending it out.
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[User Picture]From: jcreed
2016-06-27 09:52 pm (UTC)
Indeed, and I am probably going to do exactly that. K is less a fan of the general "throw money at problem to make it go away" strategy (and indeed I think I didn't use to as much always, but as time goes on the available money/free time ratio makes it seem more attractive) and also has more delicate lady-garments that she doesn't trust to other people. Already I nearly fucked up one of her dresses by accidentally including it in one of my loads at home.
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From: eub
2016-06-28 07:40 am (UTC)
Tangent: what is the usage of the lady-X construction? It carries an ironic air, and sometimes it's irony where the speaker is attributing to someone else the attitude that would say it non-ironically (which is pretty well disused). "After the Nineteenth Amendment many social critics were concerned that lady-votes were swayed by fickle emotion."

But it also comes pretty much bleached of that irony, I think. Maybe there's "haha not like we are those people who would say it non-ironically."
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[User Picture]From: jcreed
2016-06-28 11:01 am (UTC)
Yeah, I'd say you're hitting the nail on the head with that last sentence. I am somehow intending to access/appropriate the foundationally sexist/dismissive/mocking association between the word and fragility, while simultaneously making fun of the notion that I am a person who would straightforwardly say "ah, those fickle lady-voters", also by deliberately picking altilexical words like "garment". The fact of the matter is that she does have many bits of clothing which are more easily fucked up by being mislaundered. I understand it as mutual knowledge that she's thoroughly comfortable that this one fact happens to align with gender-expectations, and she makes plenty of choices that don't so align, and that's great, and the humor I think somehow comes from understanding that, uh, a stopped clock... I mean coin-flip... is right 50% of the days anyway. Something like that.

I admit it's a risky joke, really, if one thinks about it.

But it's a joke-shape that K and me have negotiated gradually over the years as comfortably in-bounds between us, that also includes things like us routinely teasing one another for conformance to the other gender's assigned foibles, e.g. K rolling her eyes good naturedly at "ugh, boys, always taking forever to get ready before going out" if I some particular time do so.
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From: eub
2016-06-29 09:31 am (UTC)
Ah, I think you've hit more nails on the head: 1) that it's often deployed where something is gender-normative, to express/affirm a shared sense that it's not causally conforming. 2) and even a shared sense that it's totes not causal because if it were anything sub-totes, the joke would be risky, and it's not like that, right? "You know I wouldn't say this if I didn't know you're comfortable with it due to our sufficient anti-sexism."


Edited at 2016-06-29 09:32 am (UTC)
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[User Picture]From: jcreed
2016-06-29 09:26 pm (UTC)
yes, you have articulated some further things I would have like to articulated. Jokes: a dangerous business.
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