May 5th, 2006

beartato phd

(no subject)

BOSTON, Massachusetts (Reuters) -- Massachusetts Tuesday called on popular teen social networking Web site MySpace.com to strengthen protection of children against sexual predators, including raising the minimum age for users to 18 from 14.

The arrest Tuesday of a 27-year-old man in Connecticut on charges of illegal sexual contact with a 13-year-old girl he met through MySpace underlines the risks of the fast-growing Internet site that boasts about 60 million members.


(from http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/internet/05/03/mass.myspace.reut/index.html)

Why the heck does this article not even approach the idea that (what I presume is essentially a voluntary systen of) age-filtering clearly didn't work? Last time I took Advanced Numberonomy I think 13 was conjectured to be less than 14. Unless you are scanning in your birth certificate or driver's license or some shit, MySpace does not know how old you are.
beartato phd

(no subject)

I had this meeting scheduled with Carsten at 1:30, and I show up and he's not there, but neelk is, telling me that he had a meeting with Carsten at 1:00, and he wasn't there then either, so we get to chatting about Neel's pattern-centric focussing sequent calculus term assignment, and then Carsten shows up and all three of us attack it, and then I talked to Carsten about my simplified linear metatheory nonsense, and he opined that it's rather like his and ssaiscps's thing but streamlined a bit, so that's encouraging. Anyway it was like quarter to four before I finally busted out of Wean and ran into max_ambiguity to borrow her copy of this book, because clearly I have not read enough crazily over-my-head books lately.

Man I am pretty excited about this work of neelk's, though. It looks like it might be a really slick way of coping with disjunction and tensor and stuff, and still sort of keeping some notion of canonical forms. If only someone can figure out what the right substitution principle is...
beartato phd

(no subject)

Some of the the most mysterious and amazing things in mathematics are its bridges, things like Stone duality, (between topology and algebra) the Curry-Howard correspondence (between logic, programming languages, and category theory), and the theory of generating functions (between combinatorics and calculus). It's generating functions that are, once again, particularly astonishing to me lately. I was looking at Catalan numbers, and there is a no-cleverness route straight from the standard recurrence, through gfs, to a closed form expression. It's the "no-cleverness" part that's so amazing; it's almost entirely mechanical if you know a little calculus, compared to the moderately big insights about transforming monotone lattice paths that all the other proofs seem to require.

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